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Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard is with Anna Derrer and Kaity McCracken.

A Shocking Adventure

If you want the short story its right here.

We lost a dog last week and yet she came back to us alive.

If you want the long story read on ....

The road travelled by #themongrolhoard last week found us working at a family owned dairy.

This particular dairy is transitioning to growing and selling replacement heifers and is no longer milking cows. The change in management and focus has kicked started the rats into motion as they move to match new feeding routines.

On a working farm it is impossible to remove the habitat and the feed that feed and house the rats, the answer is management and not extermination.

We typically visit this type of farm several times a year and they are a great location to bring friends as there is usually more than enough dog work to keep several extra dogs catching rats. Along for the adventure were good friends and their own personal dogs who are proven rat catchers. ( Kaity and "Quinn" her GSD and Anna with "Holy Mole' and Bella Bella" who are OG Mongrol Hoard memebrs )

As we know and have shared, Danger is inherent to work.

We know this well through personal loss of good dogs( Anna was also present when we lost " Sir Grumps Alot " and by the many scars and injuries accrued by a working terrier.

What you can not ever plan for is the moment it strikes.

In this particular case a freak accident struck, and it struck the smallest of forms and it struck her hard.

While working in the rear end of a large barn, the same barn pictured in the posts photo. Our small 8 lb. rescue terrier was struck down.

At the moment we did not know what happened but I will explain.

"Pea-Knucklehead aka Peanut " was found stricken on the ground with no breathing, no heart beat and eyes glazed blue in death.

She was gone, and although close to our group we heard or noticed nothing unusual in the moments leading to her current state. She was found by one of our party and a sudden and worried cry brought our attention to her fate.

This unusual and sudden event shook us all, and in all technical terms our small beloved dog was now dead but the story does not end here in tragedy.

Despite the feeling of hopeless finality in the moment. I wrapped the dog in a vest and moved to a lighted portion of the barn where I could administer CPR. Mind you, I dont know CPR, have never trained in it and am only familiar with it through posters and common information.

Chest compressions, and mouth to snout forced breathing brought no response for several minutes and the Ladies of the party rushed to box and restrain the rest of the terriers as I labored alone.

The first visible response was a weak heart beat, and after another minute or two the first labored and gurgling breaths returned as well.

While I now rushed to find the rest of our group with a vest wrapped but breathing dog who was out cold, I was unsure what had actually happened or how to proceed.

As the disaster struck , so did more fortunate circumstances as the offsite farm owner suddenly appeared with the customary box of beer that is part of our thank you package, and she insisted on rushing the dog to the vet and footing the bill as well.

Thankfully the Girls stepped up and whisked her away as the farm manager and I attempted to discovered what had happened.

This is what we found, the freak accident was truly freak.

At the place where the power came into the tin roofed barn ( the same barn pictured ) weather and time wore the insulation away from the wire and made contact with the tin roof. The roof was now live and in 2 spots a broken metal gutter also carried the current onwards. One of these came to the ground outside the barn and we were able to see a arcing the first sign of what cause our disaster. The other gutter bent inwards and touch some metal sheeting covering a old window and one of those sheets was leaning down from the window inside the barn to the floor. It carried the current the entire way from the broken wire.

As the danger became apparent and a electrician was dispatched in minutes, we were made thankful that no humans were hurt. Eight lb. "Peanut" had apparently taken a electrical charge that shut her body systems down as she pursue a rat along the wall and touched the metal.

While the dog triaged in the local emergency vet overnight and slowly regained her senses , she was cleared in good health the following morning although quite subdued.

After "Peanut" was deposited at the vet, the rogue wire had been repaired and the scene regained its normality. We attempted to finish our day up.

We counted 130 on the board with every single dog accounting for many dead rats, the combined total weight of the dead rats being 90 lbs.

I am quite thankful to say that "Peanut" is alive and as well as can be for the ordeal safe and sound in my home. In fact she may now be a shaman for all I know. What ever her work might be there is apparently at least one more rat to catch in her future...

Looking back from this story that occurred 1 week ago today. Here are a few things I learned.

I am exceptionally glad that I attempted CPR despite all hope and appearance. I am thankful that instinct kicked in and I will be doing a little more in depth study on canine first aid.

I am exceptionally thankful for my friends who aided in such a way that the ending is not of tragedy but one of hope.

In order to wrap all this up, there was a few last things I learned on returning home.

It was when I took out my video footage that the devil emerged in the details, details that were lost in the moment

While we did not catch the event on tape, and my stomach curdles even watching or at the thought.

It was the audio that clears things up.

Four of my dogs were shocked by the live current one just moments before peanut and two others in the aftermath.

The larger of the terriers screaming often sounds like the frustration of a rat they can not reach, but it explains their behavior as they all were extremely scared and nervous after the event.

The last sighting of Peanut on the video was a mere 3 seconds before she was found stricken, so although we did not know how long she lay there at the time she was found. That amount of time was extremely short.

From the time she was found until I can be heard faintly in the background that her heart had started again was a matter of 4 minutes and 39 seconds.

Wow, she was truly gone for 4 minutes and 39 seconds, and yet she has come back to us alive.

A testament to faith and to the true fighting spirit of a small terrier we call "Peanut " who lives to rat catch again another day.
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Zintkala Bravehawk-Larios, Emily McCorkle and 23 others like this

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Coulter TAI am glad your dog is safe and recovered. I am glad all of you are safe! Food for thought: the chance of survival following a cardiac arrest drops by 10% every minute. In a city, a GOOD response time for fire/EMS is between 5:30 and 6:00. As a result of YOUR quick action, you were able to capitalize on your dog’s 50/50 shot at survival. Strong work!

6 days ago   ·  2

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John HalversonAs I read this, the pressure steadily built behind my eyes and my heart began to race. I work with wild raptors under Federal permits and I ultimately bear ALL responsibility for any and all things that happen to those birds in my care; good bad or indifferent. I have had two accidental escapes, both recovered. I have had three deaths, two accounted for by extreme old age, one by freak accident. Years after the freak accident that took Little Foot I was talking to the lay leader of the local synagogue and the words escaped my lips, "I just cannot be paranoid enough". He repeated it back to me and expanded on the subject. True, I cannot be paranoid enough and I must EVER keep up my guard. But I also will not be paranoid enough and things will escape my notice. All one can do is their utmost best and take the lickings that are going to come, then learn from them in order to make the utmost best even better. After 5+ years of carrying the guilt for Little Foot's death, the same accident befell a friend's redtail hawk. She chronicled the surgeries and 4 months recovery of the bird. She talked me through how hawks can seemingly break a leg out of nowhere and how to watch for it, but are powerless to prevent it. She explained that her bird recovery was a rare miracle and the loss of our bird was the more expected outcome. I still carry the guilt, but it is alloyed with knowledge and experience now. Thanks for sharing, for challenging, for educating and encouraging. Our takeaway today is this: Canine CPR is a thing and as dog owners, we damn well better add that to our list of skills.

1 week ago   ·  5

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Terrier P. BurnsWow! So glad Peanut came out OK. I had a metal roof fall and cut open a dog once -- stuffed her guts back in her and got her to a vet and she was sewed up and came out fine. Metal farm roofs now have another caution attached to them. Eyes open!

1 week ago   ·  6

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James HoffmanWow...man just saw the post & read the story....never know when somethings gonna happen any time you hunt....urban or country....landscape is never forgiving.....damn happy peanut made it through! Good on you J for not counting her out!👊👆🙏💯

1 week ago   ·  4

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Renee L JohnsonOMG, did she have any burns on the pads of her feet? Look her pads over real good. Electricity goes in small and can exit big! So glad your instincts kicked in. Time is what made this rescue successful.

1 week ago   ·  5

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Peter WebbIf there is a way to get into trouble, Terriers will find it. When electricity earths out, the ground surrounding the earth point will commonly give an electric shock to anything standing on it. That is probably what happened to your other terriers. The intensity of the shock varies with distance so it is probable that there were more shocks than you noticed, just that some were not severe enough to make them react vocally. Peanut is probably the only one that received a full-strength shock. We’ve run electric fencing , and under the right (wrong) conditions the earth peg would shock anyone within ten feet of it. No more than uncomfortable, but not being able to see what “hit” them gave my dogs the heebies, and they were paranoid about that end of the shed.

1 week ago   ·  6

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Debi ColeWow !!! Would you mind if I shared this? Lots of farmers in my family have small dogs dogs for varmints. This is a good thing for them to be aware of.

1 week ago   ·  4

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Dave LombardI gave CPR to one of our lab pups years ago. Chest compressions with thumbs and mouth to snout. He's alive and well!

6 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

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Daniel N Amber GoodmanThomas N Tammy Balakitsis Amber Barnes Goodman Levi C Goodman

6 days ago

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Sheila MesickI was crying through this. So glad is is ok!!!

5 days ago   ·  1

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Marcia BoerThank you for sharing the story. Glad Peanut is okay. I have heart-massaged and given mouth to mouth to almost frozen newborn lambs, also newborn pups. It is an instinct that kicks in. I am glad you were quickly able to get to her, and able to transport to the vet for further treatment. ❤❤

6 days ago   ·  1
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Jeanie AuslagenThey can visit here

1 week ago   ·  1

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Greta Montagneand from a medic's perspective, temps can play a large role in this kind of situation...had it been a hot day the outcome might have been quite different. Cold is often best applied for postive outcomes in trauma. Really nice account writing BTW.

1 week ago   ·  10
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Yvonne BreukersJordan, one day you'll be able to publish a book about all the adventures your human and dog pack has gone through. I'm glad you mentioned that she was not gone before you started, as I was riveted from the get go! Peanut likely saved who knows how many lives by taking that hit!!! Shaman she is:)

1 week ago   ·  3
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Nancy Fontaine ThurmanJust watched a vid yesterday where they brought an old wolf back with CPR from anesthesia gone awry. I was shocked how much longer it takes for a canine than a human, and that they seem to recover more completely after an extended period of no heart beat. Job well done by all!! Go Peanut!

1 week ago   ·  3
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Dawn Birdsong Vadbunker OlmstedGreat work with the CPR! I think hands only would work too. As an experienced practitioner of Human CPR, push hard and fast, approx. 100x per minute. depress the chest wall 1/3 of the thickness of the chest. Seems reasonable for dogs too. Just an aside, electrical shock victims can be revived longer after the injury than victims of other sorts of lack of heart function. Final point is it could be a person at some time in the future. Your work is hazardous for humans too, it’s a good idea to get CPR training. Quick thinking and determination saved the dog!

1 week ago   ·  5
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Jennifer LeachBravo to you for not giving up! I've done mouth-to-snout and an improvised Heimlich on two of my terriers, both times saving their lives. Well done, Jordan!

1 week ago   ·  4
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Bob PowellWe had a great rat Terrier when I was a kid. I’ve witnessed her take eight in a row coming out of a tunnel we were flooding without missing any. She was greased lightning. Amazing. She only got hurt once over a fifteen year career. Rat landed on her back and delivered a savage bite to the back of her neck. It just made her hate them deeper.

6 days ago   ·  2
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Cindy OrrWhew! !! My goodness- the trauma of going thru all this...it's the stuff nightmares are made of..so relieved to read that Peanut is ok as you and the rest of the gang are.

1 week ago   ·  2
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Acorn Hollow FarmsGreat story So glad Peanut made it. Farming can be a very dangerous profession that most people don’t realize. Keep up the rat catching.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Renee L JohnsonMouth to snout is correct, and chest compressions are more of a side compressions than a downward compressions over the sternum like in people. MANY years ago before the CPR was as it is now, we were taught a back pressure arm lift, that works well on dogs and cat too, or sometimes what you are really doing is moving and stimulating them.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Marvin BrassassWhat a story! I am so glad that P-nut is recovering. As you know these dogs are fighters, and with your help she fought to make it back because she has more rat hunting business to do.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Lane JohnstonSo glad Peanut made it. The work you do is definitely dangerous to man and dog. But you are running with the right crowd to handle it.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Richard ReynoldsYou never know. You've had more than yopur deserved share of freak accidents. Thanks for telling the story. It's one we need to know and remember. Go Peanut!

1 week ago   ·  2
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Kathy ParkerGood for you for doing everything you could think of. I gave mouth to mouth to a turkey that suffocated in my arms but I couldn’t do CPR on her because they was no way to get at the heart. For mammals, it is possible and I would not hesitate to do it on my dog or cats. Electrocutions and drownings are the most likely to come back from with CPR so you did exactly the right thing. Congratulations on saving Peanut and thanks for sharing the story.

7 days ago   ·  1
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Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard is with Lanore Riebli and 6 others.

The Never Ending Tunnel
The Tunnel That Never Ends 2017 and the Hope of Dead Rats to Come 2018

This video is a typical of the work we do. We the #themongrolhoard are inside a turkey coop at this poultry site digging in the hard , dry summer clay.

The rats bunker down as we trench the tunnels and get closer to the spots they are hiding and the dogs get more intense the closer we get to the rats.

The dogs here are actively competing for action and you can see the dogs with more drive push their way into the mix.

This particular hunt had multiple friends and extra dogs and we would normally have a little less dogs in the mix to avoid accidental altercations of over which hole is covered by what dog.

This complicated dance is worked out prior to a hunt between my own dogs and pack hierarchy determines this for my own dogs. This gets really interesting at times when you have a lot of high drive terriers in one spot.

This is one of the main reasons we do not just allow anyone who has a terrier along for a hunt.

We do get asked continually to be observed , to work others peoples dogs or for permission to come with a terrier or two on a hunt by people unrelated to our work.

For the most part at this stage of our work we are no longer interested in working with pet dogs.

The gap in understanding of not only how dogs work in motion and also what a farm and farm conditions are like take far to much to explain when we are doing our thing.

Terriers not well socialized or used to a pack environment can screw up the dynamic in a hurry.

Why is that is a issue ?

Break a pack rule, receive pack instruction.

What does that mean ?

That means if you cause a issue over what dog has the right to what hole, already worked out in my pack and you break that rule , you make have the entire #themongrolhoard setting your little pet straight on the rules when it does not read dog talk clearly spoken.

The friends and dogs we do have along not only understand how to control, handle and manage their own dogs but also have met the entire working pack in a neutral setting first before a hunt.

We do however love helping farmers and other with terriers that need working experience learn dog speak, dog handling and basic first aid when it comes to actual ratting dogs.

These people become my farm family, often giving me a home away from home when I am on the road rat catching.

In the end we catch every rat we can or give it our best effort along the way. The best we can ever do is try.

We wish all our friends, farm family, and followers a happy new year in 2018 and hopefully will see you along the road as we continue our rat catching adventures.

Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard of Rascally Rat Wranglers
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Anna McDermott, Joyce Stewart and 23 others like this

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Noma Rice MooreI have wondered how the pack works with new and different dogs. Thanks for clearing that up. They are amazing to watch.

3 weeks ago   ·  3

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Barbara BuchananHahaha!!! Well done video! I especially love the freeze frame of the tug-of-war through the fencing!

3 weeks ago   ·  3
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Kirsten BeierDo the dogs like all aspects of the hunt and kill or do some prefer the hunt? Is it instinct or training?

3 weeks ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Evie HarryThe two tugging on the rat through the fence is my absolute favorite! 😂

2 weeks ago   ·  2
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Sue GardnerLove the video and write up. Happy New Year!

2 weeks ago   ·  2
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La Lania HillMy bullmastiff likes to catch and shake rats found around my birds and neatly piles them up waiting for another. Great video! Wish my 16 lb feist would do that, but the big one is always up front.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Richard ReynoldsA Happy and prosperous New Year my friend. I hope we will hunt together again in 2018.

3 weeks ago   ·  2
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Chad HouchenThe Jagd for the kill!

1 week ago   ·  1
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Mashelle PainterI so appreciate your posts, Jordan. Not only is it fascinating to watch these dogs who love their job, but I also learn something about the process. Thank you for providing that education for us.

3 weeks ago   ·  2
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Logan ShanahanNathan Wolfe this is bad ass

2 weeks ago   ·  1

7 Replies

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Nancy H Welch-AlwinHappy dogs!

3 weeks ago   ·  2
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Sue HansonThe Pack!

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Kathleen WalthallLove watching the dogs work, and you do what you are a natural at...rattin and informing! Happy New Year!

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Sara JeanDianne...check out this video. I love watching these guys work!!

3 weeks ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Aaron R. GrayA+ music selection

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Ruth BlochI said it before and I’ll say it again. You guys ROCK!

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Daniel Kehoeyeeha!,love it!

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Thomas BiskupichGreat explanation of the way that the pack works*

3 weeks ago   ·  2
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Patty Cromer-Maxwellsthey have fun....that's what counts 😉

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Tam MroseHappy New Year Jreed!

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Jaime LynHappy New Year Jreed and Wranglers <3 Always love your insight.

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Ree DonkerousAmazing! 👍🏻

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Cathy ThomasHaving a blast!!!

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Lillian McHenryDo your dogs just kill the rats or do they eat them too? For some reason we have a lot of field mice this year and a few rats. Rather than get a barn cat, I was thinking of a rat terrier.

3 weeks ago   ·  2

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Gary Ashcroft NewGeoff Charnock... propa ratters....

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard is with Charles Thode and 4 others.

In the Wood Pile
The Wood Pile

Wood piles or firewood are always good rat habitat.

In this case the wood is a downed tree that fell onto or near a turkey coop and the rats found a easy condominium of safety.

Wood piles are also a dog hazard as the loosely piled rounds are heavier than a terrier. In the shifting pile it would be quite easy for a dog to get crushed or smashed.

While we did line up the outfield, it looks like the kids were not prepared to smash the runners and perhaps we need to send them to after school sports.

As we work a farm or homestead a few different times we learn were the rats habitually travel , when a rat escapes as they are bound to do. We have a rough idea of where they are heading. As we move around the farm disturbing their habitat they become easier to catch.

In the end " Lil Ms Squeakers " always get a catch.
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Diane T Rose, Steve Ellis and 23 others like this

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Mike FryDo none of you guys where gloves in case of cuts in your hands when out ratting ?

4 weeks ago   ·  1

6 Replies

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Jaime LynNever get tired of watching these lol. My lil beagle/terrorist mix that caught three (mice or rats? I dunno...They were awfully tiny...) in my house the other day... now he won't stop hunting for them lol. Alas, he did such a good job, there are no more to be had lol. I was thinking to get him a wind up mouse to chase since he has just (at age 10) discovered his calling lol. I decided against going to the pet shop and buying some to turn loose for him. I mean, in the house... although it occurred to me lol.

4 weeks ago   ·  2

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Lauri HowellI love seeing the "play" my rat does in comparison to your working ratters. It's also helpful to see them so focused on the hunt. I remember this when she won't come in from the yard. Thank you!

4 weeks ago   ·  2

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Juan C. MendozaIt was a fun day for the kids.

4 weeks ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Diana DurbinLast week my pup was barking out by my rabbits. When I checked I couldn't find what she was going on about. The next moring she threw a nice little female rat at me. Nicely crunched. Very much dead. My sweet little bunny guard!

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Myrna MorrisonWhen we get our place cleaned up, your dogs will have a ball!

4 weeks ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Susie GoddardLost my jack Russell terrier to cancer two years ago. They had a system, Sundae would dig and our cats and chickens would catch the runners. New dogs haven't figured it out and had mice in the house first time ever, old black barn cat and I took care of them, together.

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Karen GoebelHmmmm. Live in south Texas. No rat problem because the rattlesnakes get them. Woodpiles for us are "watch out for snakes" piles. Havens for copperheads as well.

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Dave CooperNice to see a proper shaped German Shepherd looking sharp!!👍🏼👍🏼

4 weeks ago   ·  4
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Charles ThodeWe always have a good and productive time when the Mongrol hoard visits. This was from a hunt this last summer at our place.

4 weeks ago   ·  2
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Maja RamirezA couple days ago Hubby texted excitedly that he heard a commotion in the front (fenced) yard with our 3 dogs (2 GSDs and 1 Briard), came from the back to look - and they were killing a big city rat! He thinks the Briard in flinging the rat up delivered the coup d'grace! (does this make her an honorary GSD, or the others honorary Briards?) No classes needed - so proud!

4 weeks ago   ·  1
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Cindy OrrAlways enjoy watching real working dogs. ..ggive'em all a treat! !!

4 weeks ago   ·  1
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Mashelle PainterI love seeing how excited they get when they spot a rat!

4 weeks ago   ·  1
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Susan MacleanPATRAY in the pile! <3

4 weeks ago   ·  1
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Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard is with Charles Thode and Brandon Riebli.

The Only Expected Outcome

There is only one outcome that can be expected from the friends and dogs of #themongrolhoard when we show up on a farm.

That outcome is the result of hard work far beyond just showing up that day.

The dedication of continually hunting on a regular basis not only keeps the dogs sharp but also on task.

Even a good dog will not know what it is supposed to do, without exposure and experience. It will aimlessly or enthusiastically participate without much success. The catches it might make, often luck based on accidentally being in the right spot.

With continual exposure to Rattus Norvegicus and a farm environment the dogs of #themongrolhoard and farm family not only know what to expect and how to perform. This is conditioning that only experience brings.

It takes time and effort.

If you wonder how we catch rats, it isnt magic and its not rocket science.

Its also not because we have the best dogs.

Plain and simple it is because we load up the dogs and go rat hunting on a regular basis.

Making the effort to drive many hours, deal with less than favorable conditions and weather and in the habitual conditioning that occurs through active work.

The dogs are kept mentally sharp and stay in sync as valuable members of a ratting pack that works together for the demise of any rat found on the premise.

The result is is clearly visible.

Good Dogs and Dead Rats Whacked , Stacked and Counted on the Board.
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Stella M. Fort, Rachel McLeod Spainhour and 23 others like this

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Adrian ColombeDid you get any video, love your videos

1 month ago   ·  3

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Lorett RileyLol!!! Hahaha food source!! We need more hawks coming in close i guess!! Gosh is tbere any animal besides birds that eat them?? I mean....people even eat bugs!! Nothing eats Rats!!! Hahaha° Your Mongrelhoard is Safe from job loss!!

1 month ago   ·  2

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Jay HeldThis would make a great Christmas Card. 🤣

1 month ago   ·  1

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Kris Kozy TancrediIt is SO awesome to see them using their instincts they were bred for! Great job!!

1 month ago   ·  4
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Danelle RoundaboutsMan hard work that is an understatement. You guys go to town!!

1 month ago   ·  4
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Jaime LynThat's so cool. I have a terrier/beagle mix who just now at age 10 has discovered his talent for ratting. He loves it and keeps getting better at it.

1 month ago   ·  4
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Barbara TrippUsed to be every farmstead had ratter dogs to keep their feed and grain safe and clean. This too is fading away. Keep up the good work! I enjoy your posts.

1 month ago   ·  5
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Jessica NortonWhere state are you in that there are so many rats 😨😬

1 month ago   ·  2

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Mashelle PainterWell done!

1 month ago   ·  2
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Cindy OrrGood doggies!

1 month ago   ·  3
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Lorett RileyAs I clean out from under my kitchen sink from another mouse break in!! Dammit!

1 month ago   ·  2
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Randall MullinsI counted 66 .... Good job !!

1 month ago   ·  1

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Stephany WilkesYou do such good, important work. Thank you.

1 month ago   ·  1
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Sue HansonIt's the same with any breed that has a purpose. They need a job to keep that skill sharp. It all depends on their humans and how much effort they are willing to put in to it. Love your posts, pictures and dogs. Merry Christmas.

1 month ago   ·  1
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Patty Cromer-MaxwellsWay to go team! 🙂

1 month ago   ·  1
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Lorett RileyActually...RESPECT!!

1 month ago   ·  1
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Lynn Benhart-BonhamIs that the little Ruby ? Xoxo

1 month ago   ·  1
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Sean LandenbergerResults

1 month ago   ·  2
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Andre LedayLuv it

1 month ago   ·  3
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Lorett RileyAh, another one bit the glue trap n is gone.

1 month ago   ·  2
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Sue GardnerGreat job man and beast!

1 month ago   ·  1
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Jaime Abbas RestorffI love that your dogs have jobs. My dogs have jobs too and you are so right in the assessment that training is for life, continuous and ongoing. It doesn’t matter if you’re tired or busy, sick or sad, the dogs need to be worked as sure as they need to be fed. My dogs love to hunt and work together to catch mice in the wood pile. They have our property critter free from opossum, squirrels, chippies, rabbits, mice, coon and even a woodchuck. How excited would they be if we did this everyday? I would love to talk more about this. Now that we are retired, my dogs would love this and frankly, so would we.

4 weeks ago   ·  1

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Lisa BrennanToo bad rats cant be a food source!

1 month ago   ·  1

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Goldie SmithEliminating vile vermin the humane way, without indiscriminate, continuous killing of non-targeted collateral damage left, in the wake of poisons, the Mongrol Hoard & brother packs, across the US & in other countries, provide a much-appreciated & needed Service to mankind: 4 legged & 2 legged Heroes !!

1 month ago   ·  1
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George SnyderGood job, getting rid of those pesky RATS👍👍👍👍

1 month ago   ·  2
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Munchkin Mania
Munchkin Mania

If you follow our adventures regularly.

You know about the terrible loss we faced this fall when we lost Golly Gurl our queen bee and most experinced rat catcher. This loss was caused via liver and organ failure after a flea medication Trifexis was administered to the dogs of #themongrolhoard

Such a loss and in the manner that it occured is heartbreaking.

A experienced dog and the bond of trust and shared experiece is invaulable and can not be replaced.

After a work contract ended and I finally headed home to face the loss first hand after several months away. I decided to bring home a new addition or prospect to the pack.

While she is yet unnamed officially and is called many things at the moment her antics and energy have helped to begin healing by constantly being in everyones business and leaving no moments for sadness in her wake.

"Littles ", " Munchkin Mania" , " Love Missile" or what ever she is called for the moment is a falconry cross bred dog. She is a Dachshund 50% x Jack Russel 3/8's x beagle 1/18th. Bred for trailing and flushing rabbits from cover to dispatch by hawk this type of cross is typical for working dog women and men.

A trapped gopher unwittingly lended it self to a instinct test and introduction of the fresh enegy here on the homestead. I do not expect performance from young dogs and set them up for success by making games of future work.

I also do my utmost to keep a dog from harm, injury or a negative experience as this can cause a dog to shy from work in the furture. There is nothing to be gained from trying to force something that will develope naturally in time given guidence and structure.

I think she is showing all the right signs of interest and trainability and look forward to sharing her progress as she proves her value and worth and works to earns a permanent spot as a working bitch in my pack.

O yea, thats Scruffy making all the fuss who steamrolled that gopher a few seconds later.
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Thomas Biskupich, Юра Максимов and 23 others like this

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Maurice MasonSorry to hear that. Just the info alone about what to do about rats is a great service to the rest of us. I never knew that's what rat terriers did. Thank You. Do you sell pups?

1 month ago   ·  2

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Jennifer LeachHope little Love Missile helps your heart heal! 💔🐶💔🐶

1 month ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Carl WilkensIs this a litter mate to mine?

1 day ago

11 Replies

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Jared IsaacsonHow’s she turning out so far?

4 days ago   ·  1

5 Replies

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Danelle RoundaboutsShe is just so adorable and that face! pounce and git that squeakie! I can see she is a heart mender.

1 month ago   ·  3

1 Reply

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Darryl Scott Sampson JR.Would you be willing to provide the breeder you got her from info? Im am very interested in a mix like this.

1 month ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Damree JacoshenkI could guess, but what kind of mix is she? She’s cute! And quite tenacious 😉

1 month ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Melinda RalstonBeautiful pup you have there Jreed

1 month ago   ·  1
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Mary Jo ClarkLooks like a very nice addition to the Hoard 🙂

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Tisha AbbottShe is a beauty! Congratulations on the new addition.

1 month ago   ·  1
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Shae WoodWhat a sweet girl! Hopefully she's all for you that my weiner is for me!

1 month ago   ·  2
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Cindy OrrPup's got some good moves on them little legs! Good doggie.

1 month ago   ·  1
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Goldie SmithShe's an energetic, sharp & alert little beauty; Congratulations, Mongrol Hoard !!

1 month ago   ·  1
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Dyann BlaineCan't wait until you bring her down for her first taste of ratting in Orinda!

1 month ago   ·  2
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Yvonne BreukersI'm sure Golly Gurl would have approved, sooner or later. What a cutie and all the right instincts and drives:)

1 month ago   ·  1
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Brenda BrinkleyI love her!! Congratulations

1 month ago   ·  2
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Thomas DriverMem Murphy Driver read the first paragraph

1 month ago

7 Replies

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Terrier P. BurnsI like her! 👍👍👍❤️❤️❤️

1 month ago   ·  1
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Lisa SkinnerShe's wonderful! Looking forward to watching her grow up under your care!

1 month ago   ·  1
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Hannah LehmannCharlotte holy shit falconry dogs

1 month ago   ·  2

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Diane JohnsonAwe... She is going to be a grand Hunter ! And a looker too !!

1 month ago   ·  1
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Lane JohnstonAppears to be a keeper.

1 month ago   ·  1
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John Kayeis this a new member to you pack Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard

1 month ago   ·  2

3 Replies

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Dan ClarkBolt, as in Lighting Bolt!

3 weeks ago   ·  1
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Jeanette LandbergLove it

1 month ago   ·  1
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Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard shared The Leviathan's Lair's post. ... See MoreSee Less

The Leviathan and Scruffy of #themongrolhoard , plus Holy Mole' OG Mongrol Hoard and friends

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Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard added 5 new photos.

Raw Fed Anyone?

A excellent suppliment for any dogs diet , in this case a elk carcass and trim.

The carcass was chopped to feeding size chunks for freezing and the trim was ground and packaged. It will be a suppliment for a dog on injury or recovery. I will feed out chunks twice a week or in bad weather when the dogs are bored and stuck at the house.
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Leslie Rowe, Zoe Pastén and 23 others like this

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Beth QuadeI've been raw feeding for about 15 yrs. My dogs have 3 upright freezers-currently almost stuffed full-I have deer, elk, sheep, alpaca, emu, and turkey for ground...lambs, kids(goats), piglets, chicken, turkey for bone in. I used to grind my own organ mix, but have switched to a supplement to make things easier, and for more free up space in the freezers.

2 months ago   ·  1

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Dave SidotiCracks me up when people think its weird or wrong to feed meat and bone to a carnivore lol

2 months ago

2 Replies

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Maja RamirezThe vet I've taken all our dogs to for 36 years says raw bones that don't splinter are fine (so, no ribs and small bones - but maybe "small" bones are not a problem for small dogs? Haven't ever had a small dog)

2 months ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Ruth BlochI follow your page and just love it when new pics and videos are posted. Now to find you feed raw! I've been a raw feeder for over 30 years. Your dogs are awesome and so are you!

2 months ago   ·  1

6 Replies

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Shae WoodDo they get the bones? I swear my boy gets tummy pains when he eats raw bone/kills (usually deer legs/fresh quail.....)

2 months ago

5 Replies

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Chuck KerrDo you cook it before feed it?

2 months ago

1 Reply

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Chris ScheideThat's backstrap above that trachea! goodeats

2 months ago

6 Replies

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Jamelle LyonsO god, I love your meat cleavers!! Carbon steel?

2 months ago

1 Reply

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David WilliamsMine get duck and goose quite often this time of year

2 months ago   ·  3
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Jacqueline ElliottYes! The bone 🍖 is precious resources for natural teeth cleaning as well. The dogs 🐕 say #twopawsup

2 months ago   ·  3
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Jennifer LeachMy terriers get raw deer and elk meat with Honest Kitchen grain free and they get all of the leg bones. They're healthy and their poo stays nice and firm! 💩🐶💩🐶

2 months ago
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Lisa Chociejit is ALL I ever feed my dogs, cats, ferrets, hedgehogs .. Species Appropriate Raw Food Diet 🙂

2 months ago   ·  1
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Kathleen WalthallI want to be one of your dogs...

2 months ago   ·  1
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AJ HoarTheir whole diet is raw. It’s super beneficial. I love it.

2 months ago   ·  2
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Patty Cromer-MaxwellsElk ia delicious for humans & beasts! My pack is feasting on a deer waaaaay up in the woodsthat was more tha likey shot,ran & died...good food for them but yuck w/ all the 'parts' being brought home here...I guess it saves us some $ in dry kibble 😉

2 months ago   ·  1
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Mair VeuDog food? Heck yea I’d even buy if I was around there

2 months ago   ·  1
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Pamela SpinkI typically feed anywhere from 30% to 50% raw. Just depends on how well hunting season has gone and if I see any good meat deals at the store.

2 months ago   ·  1
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Anita CrumI gave my pups deer legs from husband's kill, he has a hard Time with it, I say it's natural....lol

2 months ago   ·  2
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Dyann MarieLucky pups...elk is yummy!

2 months ago   ·  1
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Dian Woodwardso lucky. woo-hoo

2 months ago   ·  1
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Harrison StroudSo jealous! 😍

2 months ago   ·  1
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Jreed and his Mongrol Hoard is with Brandon Riebli and Lanore Riebli.

The Friends and Dogs of #themongrolhoard doing what they do best
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Jessica Troxel, Carolann Shipp-Trenary and 23 others like this

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Patty Cromer-Maxwellsan assortment of color! Many more left to get I'm sure!

2 months ago   ·  1
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Terrier P. BurnsHave you written up anything on your smoker?

2 months ago

1 Reply

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Kelly McGillGreen technology isn’t always new technology.

2 months ago
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Susan MacleanAnother round of Milk Bones boyz! <3

2 months ago
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Nodie WilliamsWell done!!!

2 months ago
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Lynn Benhart-Bonham

2 months ago
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